6 Advanced Twitter Tips To Help YOU!

By Rachel Thompson
ID-100127092

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Here are a few advanced Twitter tips that you might find helpful

1) Period before the Twitter handle (aka .@): 

Ever see a reply with a period before the @ and wonder if someone accidentally hit a button or if that was on purpose? And why would they do that at all? Here you go:

If you dot before you @mention, your Tweet shows up in the feeds of all of your followers. If you don’t dot before you @mention, your tweet is considered conversational and only shows up on your stream, the stream of whoever you Tweeted at, and those lucky followers you both have in common. So, if you want to Tweet directly at someone and you want it to go to all of your followers’ feeds, dot before you @mention (via the socialu101.com).

This is particularly helpful during a chat. Important: this trick is only for when you @mention people at the beginning of your Tweet (when you hit ‘reply,’ the @mention is automatically placed at the front).

2) Threads (aka ‘view conversation’): 

Do you ever receive a tweet that seems to reference something, but there’s no conversation attached? Happens ALL the time, particularly with newbies. Don’t do that! It’s confusing for the recipient. Instead, simply hit ‘reply!’

If you are joining a conversation or replying to something, look at the thread — even go back to the original tweet. It takes only seconds and will save you tons of trouble in the long run.

3) 115 characters or less: 

According to social media scientist Dan Zarrella:

Tweets between 100 and 115 characters were 34% more likely to be ReTweeted than Tweets outside of that range, with a 99.9% confidence interval. A big drop off in ReTweet probability occurs once Tweets get beyond about 120 characters, but up to that point, the longer the Tweet, the better (data set is up to 1.4 million randomly selected Tweets,  from 1.2 million different accounts.)

4) Use visuals:

The stats say that ‘tweets with pix are 20% more likely to be read and 94% more likely to be remembered.’ So if you really want to engage, do it with visuals (BizCommunity, 2014)* Source: bufferapp.com, 2013. I typically find the best pix on Pinterest (just be sure to always give attribution).  

5) Advanced Search:

Use both Search and Advanced Search to find followers (i.e., look up terms like #bookblogger, #bookreviewer, #bookworm, #reviewshare, #amreading) to find readers. Remember, you want to connect with readers and influencers, not only other authors.

6) Never miss retweets again:

Create a retweet (RT) column in Tweetdeck or Hootsuite, as well as a column on your full name (not your Twitter handle), and/or your website also. We miss many RTs because someone didn’t use or didn’t know our handle. This way, you don’t miss anything!

I’ll provide six more tips next week. Please let me know if you have any questions. And as always, remember to use any social media channel to build relationships with your readers, not to sell, sell, sell! Make a friend, make a sale.

 

 

 

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